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Millennials and Marijuana: Social Change and Bud vs. Booze

Born into an era of constant and lightning-fast change, Millennials have had to adapt to new technologies, attitudes, and ways of life much more rapidly than previous generations.

This means they have a huge influence on economic and social trends – arguably even more so than young people in the past.

With the rise of social media, blogs, smartphones and 24-hour all-access news channels, information is readily available to those who take initiative to learn all of the platforms.

Because of Millenials seemingly ingrained understanding of trends and technology, this generation has the opportunity to educate and even be thought leaders in a way Baby Boomers and Gen-Xers wouldn’t have had access to in the past.

One thing we know about Millenials is they use social media to drive social change and social good.

But what does all this have to do with cannabis?

Why do Millennials choose cannabis over cocktails? What are their reasons for consuming cannabis? And why are they integral to the progress of legalizing marijuana?

When it comes to the promotion of legalizing cannabis, Millennials are lightning-fast. Perhaps it’s because they didn’t grow up in an era where scare tactics were common and common-sense info was limited. Maybe it’s learning from their parents the personal experiences and benefits of bud over booze. It could be social media’s ability to turn anyone into an instant activist.

Marlene De Leon seems to think that many should have made the bud-over-booze decision a long time ago.

“Our livers begged us to stop. As a depressant, alcohol impairs judgment. This can mean bad decisions with little to no memory the next day and a hangover to boot. The worst thing I know of that has ever come from smoking a bud is finishing a whole bag of Doritos when you swore you were ‘Just going to have one,” she says.

A new study suggests that Millennials contribute to the decline of booze sales because marijuana is cheaper and lasts longer. That said, more studies are needed to offer a definitive conclusion as to why more Millennials are choosing marijuana over previous generations’ libations.

It could be the medical benefits – for many, it helps with physical ailments such as back or knee pain, for others it helps with anxiety and for some it even it helps with productivity, puts them in a better mood, helps them sleep and the list goes on.

Here at Canndora, we think a political stance based on info drives their attention, there are more benefits to consuming cannabis as opposed to alcohol, plus there’s the promised profitability of the industry.

To us, it boils down to this particular generation being forced to be more aware of their surroundings through the Internet’s constant info and interconnectivity. With this comes peer education based on fact and experience.

As many of us know, cannabis consumption more often than not happens through word-of-mouth recommendation in through a social setting, both which Millenials exceed at.

They would much rather hear a friend say they benefitted from cannabis rather than a corporate organization saying the same thing through a billboard. This eliminates the race, gender, sexual orientation, and socio-economic status that can lead to a smaller circle of influence. It is all based on education, facts and trust. Whether or not preceding generations think that is the way to a better future, it’s what has been working for Millennials.

Millennials serve a greater purpose than just lighting a spliff with friends; they may have had an easier time, but they truly have taken what their predecessors fought for and elevated it with education. They are redefining the cannabis industry, benefitting generations both past and future.

We’ll cheers, er…toke to that!

What generation do you think has had the greatest influence on the cannabis industry? Let us know on Facebook, Twitter and Instagram!


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